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The updated changes go in to effect on 1 January 2015, the state Xinhua news agency stated on 2 4 April. These very expected changes come in reaction to a huge amount of community angst over pervading pollution that’s stifled China, the globe’s 2nd-biggest market.

An Increasing Pervasive Pollution Problem

Workers have now been unwilling to go to China owing to the state’s higher pollution speeds. This is serious for the Chinese economy, the environment is one aspect of Chinese life that was sacrificed to maintain the country’s economic growth. Now it seems that the costs are starting to mount, the reality that you cannot indefinitely pollute the land you live on, the water you drink and the air your citizens breathe. An increase in concern is long overdue in China over

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Japanese electronics leading Panasonic pronounced in March 2014 it’ll spend a wage premium to its workers working in China, compensating them for enduring China’s pollution.

Panasonic is considered to be the first company to pronounce a premium that compensates for polluted atmosphere.

Previously, in March, Initial Li Keqiang declared a “war on pollution” throughout the state’s yearly parliamentary session.

In 2013 several towns in China, the planet’s biggest vehicle marketplace, have determined to limit the sale of new automobiles. Quickening deliveries have driven municipalities to step-up attempts to fight air pollution.

Land pollution has become increasingly widespread as information of tainted rice and other harvests appears. The latest report that was published last week suggested that nearly 60% of China’s ground water was polluted – a huge figure and something that has genuinely scared the Chinese. There is a report out detailing some of these concerns – you can pick it up from YouTube and on Netflix, you’ll need to access the US version – try this link Watch US Netflix in Canada.

There is an expectation that some good might come from this Chinese crisis, at least in environmental technology. There are reports of some serious money being channeled into research for greener energy sources and technologies. There are some documentaries currently available on the BBC iPlayer which details some of these areas, including some fascinating research in Spain, you can get access by this technique.

Even among environmentalists, wind power is a fairly controversial subject. Many people object to it’s use particularly when huge turbines are placed across our countryside. Other’s argue that it is inefficient and simply not cost effective and other sources of energy like solar should be pursued. So a recent report should be very welcome from those who advocate wind power as an important part of our energy requirements.

The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland has reported that wind power has saved Ireland upwards of one million Euros in energy costs, reduced the level of greenhouse gas emissions and all this without affecting customer’s energy bills. It’s said that Ireland’s wind profile is one the best, something that many Winter visitors would attest to.
Wind Farms

The organisation defended the people who criticised the turbines and the effect on the landscape by insisting that they would be careful where these turbines would be sited. There are many sparsely populated areas and boggy marshes where it’s unlikely to cause an issue. He added that many wind farms have been accepted into communities who have no real issue with them.

There is perhaps more leeway for using wind farms in Ireland and across the water in the United Kingdom purely because there is more space to locate these turbines in areas where the population will not be affected. You can see loads of coverage in local news across the United Kingdom on the BBC website about the protests against wind farms – if you want to watch the actual reports this page explains how to get BBC Iplayer in Ireland.

There is a worry in France for many environmentalists, specifically those who backed the current President – Francoise Hollande in the last election. Many of them voted for him because of a single important pledge – to reduce the country’s reliance on nuclear power for it’s energy needs. The issue is becoming a major concern with an increase in coverage in the mainstream media not just ‘green’ coverage, you can access most online from outside the country by using a France proxy.

Nuclear Power Stations

In fact he promised to halve the use of nuclear energy, which is no small feat for France. The country is the world’s biggest user of atomic energy, about three quarters of all it’s energy is derived in this way. But even if you don’t have objections to nuclear power on environmental concerns, there is a big problem with France’s reliance on this energy. Most of the nuclear reactors are now approaching the limit of their life expectancy, the majority were built in the 1970s and 40 years is considered a safe lifespan.

This means that the majority of the stations should really be decommission shortly, although there seems to be a lack of preparation to do this. Most expect that the aging stations will be kept open a little longer. The problem is that switching to different energy forms is extremely expensive, and will very likely effect the economy in the short term.

The discussion is likely to be quite lively, environmentalists have trusted President Hollande with their vote on this issue but the economic implications could be huge. France’s economy is still almost stagnant and it’s recovery is still among the weakest in Europe – the cost implications of a switch in it’s energy base would likely slow the economy even more.

It’s an interesting debate and one that is probably going to be repeated in other countries across the world. Here’s another source of information on changing your ip address so you can access French only content through a proxy – read this.

Japan Starts Turning Green

March 4th, 2014 | Posted by theadmin in Uncategorized - (0 Comments)

There has been a noticeable change in attitudes in Japan since the events of 2011.  The earthquake and Tsunami obviously had a devastating effect, but it’s probably the disaster at Fukushima which were the real turning point for the Japanese people.   The change has been noticeable among both businesses and individuals with all sorts of ‘green energy’ projects springing up all over the country.

There have been cooperatives established by businesses and citizens to help create new energy sources.  In the city of Odawara, a group of companies have established an independent energy company to help provide an alternative to nuclear based plants.    They are focusing initially on solar energy, by installing panels in strategic locations through out the city, but also construction has begun for a large solar plant which is hoped will supply energy for around 300 households.

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There is a genuine drive to try and take lessons from the tragic events to make Japan a better place.  Japan was of course famous for it’s high growth rate at the turn of the last century, an economic boom that was largely supported by over consumption domestically.  The dumps and tips in Tokyo were full of one and two year old TV sets as the Japanese upgraded routinely in all manner of products.  But you can feel the change, the events of March 2011 and the decade of stagnation in the economy have made the Japanese think again of repeating the same mistakes.

If you watch  the Japanese media you’ll see a huge difference in attitude from the 1980s and 90s, although you’ll need some language skills and use of a Japanese proxy in order to listen to them.   This is a much different society,  one that has changed it’s priorities.   There’s a good hope that this change in direction will benefit green technology directly with an increase in research and development in this area.    We have seen all ready a Japanese firm generating electricity from the food waste of a noodle factory and the pulp from an nearby orange juice maker.

It’s not all good news on the environmental front though, there are still some who think the future needs nuclear power.   The Government is currently drafting it’s latest energy policy and nuclear certainly plays an important part in that.   Public opinion is definitely against this, stories of radiation poisoning which keep appearing are likely to polarize this view.

For more information on technology citations: please see here.